Saturday, April 11, 2009

We're all subject to the law

Good government activists are warning that the dropping of all charges against former Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens and the tossing of his seven felony convictions could give U.S. prosecutors cold feet in going after other politicians who are suspected of crimes.

The "good government" activists in this case is Judicial Watch, an organization that usually has its collective head screwed on pretty straight. But in this case, they're looking at it from only one side.

He (Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch--FH) said the dismissal of corruption charges against Stevens, and the subsequent opening of an investigation into the prosecutors in the case, sends a signal to U.S. attorneys that "it's not worth it going after big-name politicians."

No, Tom, the message it sends is that prosecutors have to follow the law when they are prosecuting someone for a crime. You know, the law--it's that thing that, as officers of the court, that they have sworn to uphold?

Breaking the law in order to enforce it pretty much makes a mockery of the system. We're better than that. We should expect our public servants to be better than that. An yes, that includes Ted Stevens--if he's guilty, he should be thrown in prison. But we do it right--no short cuts.

Get your head screwed back on straight, Judicial Watch, before people start thinking you've chosen sides.

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