Friday, March 25, 2005

Flying

(Via The Travel Insider)

I used to fly a fair amount on commercial airlines. I wasn't what we would now call a "frequent flyer", but I probably averaged once a year in the 80s. In the 90s, after marriage and kids, flying became a non-issue--no money and no need.

Now, the kids are older, money is sort of available, and there are some places I'd like to see that are beyond what I consider an easy drive of a day or two duration. But I'm going to drive if I want to go to them. No flying for me.

Since the advent of the TSA, I've made a rule that it will take a situation beyond life and death for me to subject myself to the tender mercies of the TSA and the commercial airlines. We've all have heard the stories about lousy airline service, and based on an informal poll of people who have flown recently on various airlines, the service really is, on average, poor.

We've also heard and continue to hear stories about the TSA and their efforts to put the US airline industry out of business keep us safe while flying.

Here's the most incredible story I've heard on that subject. Completely unreported in the Legacy Media, it deserves to be known. A man is dies on an American Airlines flight for unclear reasons. The story changes, drastically, in each retelling. I won't go into the details; you need to read it for yourself.

The level of inconsistency in the story is scary. Mr. Lee is partly at fault, but the end result and what appears, to my untrained eye, to be the beginning of a cover-up are simply unbelievable.

The TSA needs to be reigned in and forced to take the steps that would result in actual safety improvements for the flying public--whether those steps are politically correct or not. The US government needs to get out of the airline subsidy/bailout business (which we as taxpayers are funding, in case you've missed it) and allow the market to eliminate the airlines that can't--or shouldn't--survive.

No comments: